Which Saw For Which Project?

Which Saw for Which Project?

 

 

Article By: Brett La Frombois
Projects By: Tim Bogert

 

Not sure if a tabletop saw is better than a circular saw for your next remodeling undertaking? Is your jigsaw mostly being used as an eggbeater at this point? (Stop doing that!) By the end of this guide you’ll know which saw to use for every type of DIY project.

 

Jigsaws

Axis WX550L

When you need to make intricate cuts for decorative projects, you’re going to need a jigsaw. The ornate trim on a bookcase, the circular top for an end table, any innovative shape you want to make, you can cut out with a jigsaw. And they cut more than wood: Plastic, metal, ceramic tile, PVC pipe, fiberglass, aluminum—just pick up the right blade from any hardware store. And they’re easy to use. The WORX Axis is light and can be controlled with one hand, since the tool usually rests on the surface of the project. Plus, your fingers are kept far away from the blade. Cut out any shape you can dream up with a jigsaw.

Project idea: Make a festive candy cane decoration using the WORX Axis. See the project instructions here:
WORX Holiday Candy Cane DIY Project

 

Reciprocating Saws

Axis WX550L

Hmmm… This saw looks familiar. It almost looks like the same saw as above. (It is! It’s the WORX Axis, a 2-in-1 jigsaw & reciprocating saw.) Recip saws are for tearing stuff down. Cutting through drywall, making a window, taking out old pipes Basically, when you’re turning an older space into a new addition, you’ll want a reciprocating saw. You could get a hacksaw and a crowbar to do the same job. Or, you could use a reciprocating saw for a much quicker, comfortable, and fun way to do those tasks. For DIY, these saws are indispensable.  You can even use the WORX Axis to trim trees, like the bottom of your Christmas tree.

 

Circular Saws

ExacTrack WX530L

For cutting larger pieces with nice, straight, long cuts, you’ll want a circular saw. And to do it right there, on-site, you’ll want a compact, cordless circular saw like the ExacTrack. For quick cuts of wood, —make sure you get the right blade—for when you’re building that deck or remodeling that basement, it doesn’t get better than the ExacTrack. The WORX Exactrack goes a step further than other brands, with a built-in cutting track that keeps the blade flush with the cutting guide board to make straight cutting even more seamless. The WORX ExacTrack is perfect for all types of DIY projects.

 

Portable Tabletop Saws

Bladerunner WX572L

The Bladerunner is a perfect tool to have in your garage or shed.  It is lightweight and portable so you can take it and set it up where you need it.  The Bladerunner comes with a variety of five blades, perfect for cutting wood, acrylic, thin tile and metal making it a “go to” tool for all types of projects.

 

Handheld Circular Saws

Versacut (WX420L)

Designed for quick rip & plunge cuts…. well maybe we should explain what rip and plunge cuts actually are. A rip cut means you are cutting wood parallel to the grain. Plunge cuts are for when you need to start a cut somewhere in the material other than the edges. Handheld circular saws like the WORX Versacut are for any instance when you don’t want to deal with a full-size circular or table saw. Handheld circular saws are kind of a nice combination of all the saws you need to make a smaller scale project look professionally made. They’re lightweight, and easy to use and maneuver. The dog might not notice your craftmanship, but your guests will. Also, the bestselling feature of the Versacut is the versatility of it, perfect for cutting any material under an inch.

Project idea: Use the WORX Versacut to make professional looking house numbers. See the project instructions here:

WORX DIY House Numbers Project

 

 

 

Summary
DIY House Numbers, Which Saw For Which Project?
Article Name
DIY House Numbers, Which Saw For Which Project?
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Not sure if a tabletop saw is better than a circular saw for your next remodeling undertaking? Is your jigsaw mostly being used as an eggbeater at this point? (Stop doing that!) By the end of this guide you’ll know which saw to use for every type of DIY project.
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WORX
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